Analyses
GSS Data Explorer includes tools that allow you to conduct basic analyses of GSS data, including tabulations, correlations, and regressions. To demonstrate, we’ll create a correlation using the variables we saved in the Search & Variables Quick Start Guide, INCOME and HAPPY.
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First, select “Correlation” as the analysis type.

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Then, build your analysis. Start by naming your correlation. Then, select one of the variables from the cart and give it a label. We’ll choose INCOME and label it “Money”.

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Since we only want to view data from the past 10 years, we use the select specific years option. If we wanted to limit our inquiry to a group of respondents (say, women between the ages of 20 and 50) we could use a case selection.

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Next, we’ll add the second variable, HAPPY, label it “Happiness”, and reuse the expression created in the Case Selection box.

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Select the “Create Analysis” button and your analysis will appear. You can then print, email, or export your analysis to Excel, PDF, or R. This export will note the GSS variable names and include the full GSS citation.

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